Why you’re safer on a bike share than a regular bike

Why you’re safer on a bike share than a regular bike


It’s heavy and unwieldy, and that’s a good thing.

Read more about the study in this piece from Vox’s Brad Plumer:

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100 Comments on "Why you’re safer on a bike share than a regular bike"


  1. Also it is because your credit card is on file, and if you destroy the bike you're in trouble. Kind of like a rental car. It isn't yours, so best be careful.

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  2. 21 out of 100M are fatal. Lol that's like nothing. No thanks bike share, I will use my own bike…

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  3. Damn you click bait! From all that's said in the video, it sounds like it's less about the bike and more about the area that people are riding in. Very misleading title.

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  4. This is such bad science. Assuming causality and guessing at the causes is cringeworthy. It is like say there are far less accidents on stationary exercise bikes than bikes out on the road – and the reason why is the design of the bikes, and that people don't wear helmets on stationary bikes. I imagine it has far more to do with who and how they are used rather than the design of the bike. In my city (Ottawa) I would estimate that most of the bike shares are used by tourists going on the bike paths along the river and canal – rarely ever going on the roads. They drive slowly, aren't commuting, and don't interact much with cars.

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  5. The real issue with bike accidents in modern metropolitan areas is the majority of private riders all fancy themselves as being in the Tour de France or similar bike race, so they buy racing bikes with the turn under handlebars they have to hunch over, and the bikes have thin tyres with little road grip. The overall effect is they have little visions and are hard to see. Compared with someone riding a bike with the traditional handlebars curving up and back, or even just flat bars like on the 'Bike Share' bikes. This means the rider is in a much more upright position which gives them a greater ability to see around them, and also they're a higher target which is much more visible to car drivers. This means they're more readily seen, and also more able to pick up a danger while they have time to avoid, something you can't do well on a racing bike.

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  6. 0,000021% fatality rate? did i do the maths correctly?. If i did, that's many orders of magnitude safer than cars, on the US. Didnt know they were THAT safe.

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  7. This video seems to get the wrong conclusions out of these numbers and results.
    Riders sitting upright, the bike being more visible because of color and the tires being wider isn't exclusive to bike share schemes, It's the bike TYPE that makes it safer not that the bike is part of a bike share system. Making the bike heavier doesn't do much good all it really does is make the bike more cumbersome and more dangerous should you fall.

    The thing that makes the difference is changing how the bike is used, those smaller faster bikes that are more common in the US are used by a niche group of people, they are package deliverers or people that want to get to work fast, we should change that so normal people use bikes, kids going to school/friends/activities, adults going to work/shopping and elderly doing the same as the adults, but also doing it to stay healthy. Bikers right now are too focused on getting to their destination fast instead of just getting to their destination. Take children going to school for example, if you make the roads safer for them to bike, they wouldn't have to race to get to school in 10 minutes. They could go at a slower pace and while on their way to school riding by talking to their friend who is right next to them also riding.

    Right now the infrastructure for cycling also isn't helping, most bike lanes are way too thin, making it so overtaking is nearly impossible without going out of the bike lane, this causes everyone to speed up, because if I am going to slow, that means I am blocking the faster rider behind me from going, thus I speed up as to not annoy him or slow him down. Most bike lanes are too thin to allow you ride side by side, thus making it impossible for parents to ride next to their child and also makes it impossible for people to have a conversation while riding. Both of these things make it so getting where you are trying to get as fast as possible is in your best interest and safer.

    Make the bike lanes wider, allows people to have a conversation with each other while riding, allows parents to ride along with their child and allows faster riders to overtake without danger, these things slow down most riders and makes the journey safer and more enjoyable.

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  8. The average bike is not 20lbs, average road bike maybe but most people don't ride road specific bikes.

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  9. This doesn't mean that bikeshares are safer than a normal bike, though. 0:31 They're not the same kinds of bikes. You could just as easily say that a safer kind of bike is safer than your bike, and not bring bike sharing into it at all.

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  10. unfortunately since then there has been a fatality…..July 1st in Chicago her name was Virginia Murry.

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  11. dont really dig heavy bikes for commute..i need a road bike for maximum speed and energy consumption efficiency.
    I dont drink coffee and so my energy is precious

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  12. My opinion:
    The reason that bike shares are safer is because they don't own the bike and they don't care if the bike gets damaged and dirty, unlike the ones who owns one, who tends to avoid any causes of their bike being damaged…

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  13. In Melbourne (Victoria, Australia) they gave you the helmets for free (or you can buy one from 7-11 for AU$5).

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  14. I don't live in DC, but I do live close enough that the drive there is pretty easily. And I'll tell you those things are everywhere. Especially in and around the national Mall and even more so if it's nice out

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  15. thin tires? that's because it's a light bike for riding long distances what the heck america? who informed y'alls?😂

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  16. took a share bike in London once. I had never had such bad brakes. You could get up to really fast speeds with them though, which I did as a mountain biker myself. I would say those bikes are pretty dangerous in my opinion, as I was not able to stop in a ordinary distance (emergency braking).

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  17. I feel like most of this has to do with the type of bike rather than the bike share part. I think the message here is that you should just get a better bike

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  18. Regardless of what bike you are on when you are commuting ALWAYS:
    1. Wear a helmet
    2. Choose a bike with lights
    3. Plan routes with bike lanes whenever possible
    4. Singal turns and stops
    5. Ride with caution

    AND NEVER RIDE WITH HEADPHONES IN!!

    Stay safe fellow cyclists <3

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  19. the last bike I had was a perfect fit to my body for both height and weight. 5'3" short legs and medium torso. it was a 24" girls/womens Schwinn Ranger Mountain bike. it was my best friend for 6 years. I used it on back trails and neighborhood riding thru 6 different zip codes and a lot of woods/dirt trails. I used it for city riding too but it was a great bike for EVERYDAY USE. my city is Seattle i live in, our bike share js called "PRONTO BIKES" . what a stupid name. bike share bikes are too big and awkward for me, their brakes suck, they cost money for every use, they're easy for bike thieves to ride away on God forbid I wanna stop at a cafe for a snack, they don't come with locks for quick pit stops, they're only allowed on streets with Green Bike Lanes, etc. plus it's not a personal use bike, so nobody's Body is physically comfortable with it for practical use. I say bike shares are a rip off and waste of money, just shitty tourism money maker is also it does. so no, they're not safer. a person's everyday use personal bike is safer.

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  20. Define regular bike please?

    People who tend to use their own bikes, ride far more often than bike share people. Some riders can do more miles in year than ride share cyclist in their entire life span.

     This video seems like a promotion for bike share programs.

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  21. How about the safety of recording an informational video while riding a bike? Any studies on that? 😛

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  22. Toronto Bike Share pricing is misleading. They charge for a 24hr access pass, but that only gives you 30 mins of usage. After your first 30 mins you get charged more money. Unscrupulous business practices' like that insure I do not do business with that company ever again.

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  23. I was gonna say it but they actually pointed it out themselves: these bikes are mostly being used in downtowns, lots of pedestrians, lower speed limits, more bike lanes, etc. This video's claim is ridiculous.

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  24. They're no fun though. The gearing makes them severely limited in speed and you put in so much more effort than even the most basic road bike.

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  25. $7 dollars per hour. ha ha ha on a heavy crap bike. You could save up for a week and buy a cheap wall mart bike for $90 bucks and be 10 times better then these crap bikes.

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  26. Yeah the brakes on bike share bikes are significantly worse in my experience. Usually the tires and brakepads are worn out faster than they replace them.
    I really wonder about accident rates between day-pass riders and year-pass riders.

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  27. I guess it's a good thing that my daily rider is a rather heavy bicycle with wide tires. Of course, it also has a custom-built electric-assist module, so it isn't exactly slow. That, and as I continue to ride it, I will be able to push more power into the wheels by virtue of my legs getting stronger due to regular work. I wonder if that would negate the extra safety that the heavy frame and wide tires provide.

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  28. Completely disagree. it all has to do with a better built bike infrastructure, places that have bike sharing are only there because of it.

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  29. My overpriced Specialized over these bike share bikes. I have felt stems, wheels, handlebars and other things flex on cheeper bikes before and I brake department store bikes in 20 minutes. Plus since I am capable of putting out over 300 Watts over a course of a longer ride and over 1500 Watts in a sprint, I could easily bend a crank arm, snap a chain (did that many times), snap or crush bearings in a pedal (did that as well) or completely destroy the bearings in the bottom bracket on those bikes, I most certainly should not use any of those things.

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  30. Yeah, nobody notices the paid advertisement here <.< Im guessing the study considered a Bikeshare "ride" (probably 1 mile in the city) vs a typical cyclist commute (upwards of 10 miles 'round trip). But hey, they got my click and full 2min view.

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  31. i'm still riding my regular bike with helment, go to end there was a bike share kill, like u said only beginners ride these and are more alert, still riding my regular bike

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  32. Heavy slow ass bike would get me nowhere and would waste my energy so fast. Probably has one fixed gear too because people are too stupid to know how to work gears

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  33. So… having a helmet makes you safer when you get in an accident but when you don't have one you are less likely to get into one

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  34. Why would I care if my mum's watching me wear a bike helmet or not? I'm from Australia, I'm more concerned about the police.

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  35. Bike shares provide a low-cost, healthy alternative to walking or public transport. That alone makes them worthwhile, even if they were no safer than a personal bicycle. Cycling is STILL less dangerous than driving or walking.

    Under even the most pessimistic of assumptions:

    Net effect of driving a car at 65mph for one hour: Dying 20 minutes sooner. (18 seconds of life lost per mile)
    Net effect of riding a bike at 12mph for one hour: Living 2 hours and 36 minutes longer (about 13 minutes of life gained per mile)

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  36. Sure a slow, heavy bike is technical safer but it’s also well…slow and heavy. This makes going places take more effort and more time.

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  37. Ugh so little information regarding private bikes you can get heavier bikes from places like Walmart and in most states a helmet is required by law and lets not forget when people don't own something they tend to trash it and ruin it where as if they owned a bike like I own a bike you want to take care of it since its an asset.

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  38. What I think is weird about helmets is that even though it makes sense to protect your head, the Netherlands has 22.5 million bikes, nobody wears a helmet there, and they are the safest country for cyclists in the world. I think maybe the cycle paths have something to do with it. Also, I'm not sure if helmets can protect from being hit by a car, does anyone know any studies about that?

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  39. A mountain bike does pretty much the same. Just don't use a speed bike…these bikes can go very fast but are much more fragile.

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  40. So they are safer cuz they are slower than other bikes and people that uses them are in general inexperienced?

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  41. they're safer cos they suck and used by idiots? all i'm getting from this video is that those tricycles with a big neon flag on them are the ultimate safety-cycle

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  42. Great. Now where are the bike lanes for these bikes? A Bike is no good if it has to use the same lane as cars without even a stripe to seperate them from car traffic.

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  43. That doesn’t mean that bike shares are safer, it’s just that people using them take less risks, especially compared to those nyc bike messengers with fixies

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  44. At $6 an hour it is because people don't stay on them as long as they would a bike they own.

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  45. its because riding a bike share bike is a like carrying around a big flashing sign saying "I DON'T KNOW WHAT I'M DOING." People then give you a wide birth

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  46. "Less likely to topple over"?!? If you have a problem with toppling over sidewalk cracks, then perhaps you should just walk. Also, I can't believe you just endorsed not wearing a helmet. Is this an SNL skit? Here's a better title for this video: Bad advice from someone who doesn't know what they're talking about.

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  47. So, nothing about the bikes specifically being shared makes them safer. Got it. Go buy a big, heavy, slow, brightly painted bike, only ride it in dense urban areas, and you're covered too.

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