Which Is The Most Dangerous Car?

Which Is The Most Dangerous Car?


Be one of the first 500 people to sign up with this link and get 20% off your subscription with Brilliant.org!

New streaming platform:

Vlog channel:

Patreon:

Facebook:

Instagram:

Reddit:

Twitter:

Discord:

Get your Real Engineering shirts at:

Credits:
Writer/Narrator: Brian McManus
Editor: Stephanie Sammann (
Animator: Mike Ridolfi (
Sound: Graham Haerther (
Thumbnail: Simon Buckmaster

References:
[1]
[2]
[3]
[4]
[5]
[6]
[7]
[8]

Thank you to AP Archive for access to their archival footage.

Music by Epidemic Sound:

Songs:

You’ve Got Me Falling (Instrumental Version) – Blanches
Bloom – Dye O
Unruh – Moon Craters
Frozen in Time – Kikoru
Time Zones – Gavin Luke

Thank you to my patreon supporters: Adam Flohr, Henning Basma, Hank Green, William Leu, Tristan Edwards, Ian Dundore, John & Becki Johnston. Nevin Spoljaric, Jason Clark, Thomas Barth, Johnny MacDonald, Stephen Foland, Alfred Holzheu, Abdulrahman Abdulaziz Binghaith, Brent Higgins, Dexter Appleberry, Alex Pavek, Marko Hirsch, Mikkel Johansen, Hibiyi Mori. Viktor Józsa, Ron Hochsprung

100 Comments on "Which Is The Most Dangerous Car?"


  1. anyone who would buy that mirage clearly doesn't give a damn about cars or driving, and is therefore, most likely, a trash driver

    Reply

  2. Can't wait for feminists to start whining about the "crash gap" because women have thinner bones than men. 🙄

    Reply

  3. At least add the km/h value as subtitles while speaking about the mph … would make your videos a lot easier to watch for me. I had to pause multiple times to calculate …

    Reply

  4. maybe it will never happen. who would buy a car with one star in safety over one with 4 or 5 stars? i guess manufacturers will do everything in their power to not let safety tests make a big difference between models. perhaps i am wrong and there is another reason for ratings and statistics do not add up sometimes.

    but than there is even manipulation for co2 emission and other less important stuff than safety…

    Reply

  5. You raised so many questions but hardly answered any of them? Honestly a subpar video. I suggest you redo it with more effort placed on answering these questions and not just raising them

    Reply

  6. The size & weight of a male is higher than most females, so designing a cars impact based on a male dummy test (more inertia, higher impact force) is realistic and costs less money. Not everything can be diverse.

    Reply

  7. Probably the heavier the car the safer it is. This should be by far the most important consideration between cars with the same results in the car crash tests.

    Reply

  8. While this vidoe may seem like a thorough investigation, I feel like there are a ton of things that were either left out or never considered. You mentioned that women are 47% more likely to experience serious injury but then completely ignored any impact it would have on the data. A car that's driven more by women, the elderly, new drivers, or in more dangerous conditions can have significamtly more fatalities per mile while still being a safe car. The video also completely ignores pedestrian fatalities, as a truck may be safer for the driver but way more dangerous for everyone around them, and having just trucks on the road would be way more dangerous for everyone. Vehical safety testing definitely needs to be updated for the 21st century, but you also have to be careful when looking at the data before you draw any incorrect conclusions.

    Reply

  9. I honestly don't think designing for a genderless dummie hurts women. I think how anatomically they have weaker bones and less muscle than an average man is the problem.

    Reply

  10. I think the point of the video is that we can't know anymore. Which is why you don't get a solid answer and probably the reason he sounds so frustrated in the video.

    Reply

  11. Government is incompetent at everything it does because everything the government does is the result of politics. This is why government should be small and minimal so that it can't screw much of anything up.

    Reply

  12. Did anyone else feel like this video started on one topic then really went on a tangent about updating car safety standards?

    Reply

  13. Did you take the car's popularity into consideration? Say, for example, there are 40 million of a specific model on the road due to it being a staggeringly popular vehicle. That would mean it is involved in more accidents and more fatalities due to there being more of them on the road, not because they were poorly designed.

    Reply

  14. Pls just comment to blow this video up and to put on pressure on auto makers, running tests and the legislative.

    Reply

  15. A Tesla owner, a Prius owner and a Ford F150 owner walked into a bar, guess which one didn't talk about his car? I think we need to take a moment to acknowledge that I said "his" car. The answer is he talked about all 3 of his vehicles; he wanted to sell his Tesla because it took too long to charge it at home and there were only 3 places within 50 miles to fast charge it but 30 gas stations in that area. He said his Prius was nice, but he almost never drove it because people teased him for having such an outdated car and that he should get a Tesla. He liked his truck, but usually drives a car because he almost never hauls anything that won't fit in the trunk of a car. No one wanted to talk to him anymore.

    Reply

  16. Great video pointing out the flaws in vehicle safety tests! However, some very very important factors are being ignored here.
    1) Is it really the car’s fault?
    If you were to look at the demographic, location, and popularity of the car, does it make sense that it’s at the top? Is it teenagers driving recklessly? Is the crash happening during the day or night? Rural, city? Is it a popular choice of car? While the most fatal crashes happen in this car, is it just coincidences or is there a correlation (not causation) between the car and a certain factor?
    2) Is there truly an ultimately dangerous car?
    If the car is a brand name (Honda, Chevy, etc) that hasn’t been modified, I’d say no. Some cars are safer than others for many reasons, but environment is a huge factor. Trucks are most likely the safest in the rural areas because of wide open spaces and having people elevated in case of crashing into, say, an animal. A small car however, would do better in the city because of low speeds and high traffic. Less open spaces or speeds for a fatal crash. They still happen of course, but a small car is most likely going to be safer in a city than the country. However, pitting a small car against a truck, truck is obviously going to be safer and have less of a chance of fatality than the other car. It’s just common sense. Not all crashes though are between a small car and big truck. How I see it, the environment will factor how dangerous it is to be in that car during a crash. There is no one brand or car that is classified as “most dangerous for all scenarios”. If you’re that concerned about self preservation, get a truck. It’s great at protecting you, but not others. If you care more about other people’s safety, get a smaller car. It’ll still protect you, but not as well when facing bigger cars.

    This is just my two cents about how I felt here. Nothing’s researched, so don’t take my claims as god-speak.

    Reply

  17. This video was far more interesting than I originally expected.

    6:15 This clip really put a lot in perspective when it comes to vehicle safety, for me. Damn…

    Reply

  18. you make the usa standards from 1970s sound like a bad thing. you have an accent from areas of the world that have way less safety standards. many cars that cant even be sold in the usa.

    Reply

  19. As a 150 pound 6' male I'm happy with these tests lol. Remember anything designed to suit women better will inadvertently hurt men more. Plus men are the ones driving cars for the most part, not women. So it wouldn't make sense to test them, an automobile is a complex machine that is best handled by a capable man. Women, of course, should have equal opportunity, but socially we need to accept that men & women are better at different things.

    Reply

  20. If you download the result reports from NHTSA, they include detailed data which allow for much better comparisons. The problem is that it's time consuming, especially if you're trying to compare a lot of vehicles. It seems like they could just increase the standards required to get 5 stars. Because yeah, it's pretty useless when everything gets 5 stars, even when the internals show significant differences.

    Reply

  21. I think this started out as a dis on the cyber truck but I suddenly found myself being woke scolded about having American size trucks and not caring about women….? and by the end of the video it was somehow an ad for Tesla.

    Reply

  22. When you make a video about car safety and don’t include Volvo, who is a big part to why cars of today is as safe as they are.

    Reply

  23. What? Why do we need gender specific test dummies when men and women are the same. Where the heck are the LGBTQAAIP+ test dummies. “Big car” is oppressive and run by bigoted CEO billionaires. If only we could have woke Swedes running our lives and not big orange man drumf.

    Reply

  24. Don't worry ladies, I can offer you a ride that is 100% safety guaranteed (and 100% pleasure guaranteed as well😏)

    Reply

  25. While the video is informative and some parts make sense…I feel there are still some major flaws with how the video presented its arguments. From the medicalnewstoday site…the average US male for all groups is 197.6 lbs. with a height of 5ft 8 in. The average female in the US weighs 170.6 lbs and is 5 ft 4in (same site). If you build safety features for a smaller individual, you are asking for a world of hurt and lawsuits when it comes to everyone above that safety standard. The reason men are the standard is because, if you account for the heaviest weight, then the rest should more than likely be safe as well (even overly protected). Also, from the Michigan University News, women drivers outnumber men, but men still drive far more than women. "In 1963, males represented 60 percent of all drivers. Today, that number is just under 50 percent. But when accounting for average annual miles driven, men make up 59 percent of drivers on the road—down considerably from 76 percent nearly 50 years ago." The ratio is still 1.5:1. Again, if you base safety standards on female drivers, males would be filing claims left and right per injury as male drivers get into far more accidents with vehicles which is why male insurance is higher compared to females (DMV.org even does risk assessment that reflects women are less likely to get in accidents, commit moving violations, buy cars that are more costly to insure, drive less miles compared to males). As far as adjustable headseats go, both my cars can be adjusted up or down as well as the height of the drivers seat. Lastly, to say that safety standards haven't changed in years might be one point, but technology has changed a bunch to account for that (safety sense, eyesight, lane departure warning, indicators for blindside drivers, etc.). It might not be that the standards haven't changed, but that regulations have increased. Look at the Range Rover Defender which you could only buy 40-50 year old versions of because safety regulations had gotten so strict. Same as a skyline R34. The US has one of the most strictest regulations when it comes to safety and carbon emissions, so much that we don't even get the nicer versions the rest of the world gets- Audi RS6, Toyota Fortuner, Ford RS500, etc.

    Reply

  26. I wasn’t aware that the test dummies have chromosomes.
    Those bigoted patriarchal CEO billionaires are just trying to get rid of half their customer base.

    Reply

  27. 7:49 Your suggesting that there are objectively speaking, definitive absolute biological differences between Men and Women?

    Reply

  28. Now these i understand safety but makes cars hella more expencive tho. The Mitsubishi was made to be a cheap car while being safe enugh

    Reply

  29. So is there anything we can personally do to help to ask for these improvements in testing? Is there a charity that tackles this issue?

    Reply

  30. In all Latin America highly dangerous cars are still sell a lot, especially Nissan, Chevrolet, Ford, many new cars got 0 stars, apparently for auto makers a life in Latin america has much less value than one of the USA or EU

    Reply

  31. If you are just gonna get on a soapbox about the testing system then make that the title for the video. Shameful.

    Reply

  32. car crash stats never account for medical improvements, a hundred years ago medicine and surgery were leeches, enemas and thoughts and prayers!

    Reply

  33. My old 1986 mercedes has sensors to detect a frontal impact but instead of deploying airbags it retracts its seatbelts extra tight to hold you firmly into your seat

    Reply

  34. Im actually more interested in why there are companys like brilliant, who sell knowledge to the people … shouldnt it be done by the nations to educate theire people ? It doesnt mean that i disagree with the idea but curiosity and education shouldnt cost …especially for young people …

    Reply

  35. i've been following latin ncap tests for years. you learn some important stuff from the tests. like what cars not to buy.

    Reply

  36. What exactly is it with videos of this particular caliber that is preventing them from doing a re-take when they belatedly recognize they misread a certain word? Does it cost them hundreds of dollars to record a line of dialogue? Don't shove a *correction in at the bottom of the video and call it good. Do the work.

    Reply

  37. You started off talking about the Tesla Cybertruck. I was hoping you were going to dig much deeper into the dynamics of vehicles of different sizes, but you glanced over it.

    I've been told the fully unibody Cybertruck has no sub-frame. Suppose it is towing a trailer, as it is advertised to be able too. How would the hollow shell of the unibody withstand the forces the trailer will apply in a frontal crash compared to a truck with a solid ladder frame? I am not convinced it could, and I was hoping you'd look into this.

    Which get's into part two of discrepancies in vehicle sizes… What vehicles are best able to resist the forces of a collision with a tractor-trailer unit/lorry? Ie. wont be completely crushed?

    Thanks for the great videos! Keep it up!

    Reply

  38. Do another video all about how the Tesla Model S engineering language broke the crash test rating system of the NHTSA.

    Reply

  39. The Mirage is actually quite safe. This is alarmist clickbait bullshit.

    https://jalopnik.com/americas-most-dangerous-car-is-actually-pretty-damn-saf-1834762891

    Reply

  40. I know safety tests for cars are super important, but the more important thing is for people – drivers and pedestrians – to not be idiots on the road.
    Hell, anywhere.
    Seriously most accidents can be avoided if both drivers and pedestrians use their heads (the one on the top) and not being idiots.

    Reply

  41. To bring in various driving styles, age and build of the driver, where the car is driven etc. only applies if each car was designed to suit every individual driver, which is ridiculous. If a Datona race car was tested, it may have a safety rating of 5, but using miles driven per serious injury as a reference, it's likely to score 1. This is why the only suitable system to be used is refined versions of the one in use. Vehicle collisions are all about physics–not people's lifestyles.

    Reply

  42. Now lad come on skyline Supra twincam s14 keep her sideways shlaaad 🇨🇮 yeno yourself what goes on at home

    Reply

  43. This is, truly, one of the most important videos on YouTube. Thanks for making it! I was shocked to find out how archaic and useless these tests are.
    Modernizing them could literally save thousands of lives per year!

    Reply

  44. I recently saw a crash test of a 1959 car crashing into a 2009 car head-on and it was very illuminating. [edit: oops! Guess I should have finished watching the video before commenting!] We think of those old cars as being "built like tanks", but that old car was UTTERLY destroyed. The occupants would 100% have been dead. On the other hand, the 2009 car did just fine, even if you factor out the air bags. Cars may have been heavier back then, but the way that weight was utilized makes all the difference in the world.

    Reply

  45. I am, however, interested in HOW Tesla is going to make the Cybertruck crash-worthy without an appreciable crumple zone.

    Reply

  46. The reason they use equivalent weight vehicles because if they used larger vehicles, no subcompacts would pass, and we'd all be stuck driving gigantic fuel chugging trucks. The problem isn't that subcompacts are less safe when they get hit by vehicles over twice their weights, it's that so many people who don't need a 5,000+ pound vehicle are driving one.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *