The Greatest Automotive CEOs Of Our Time

The Greatest Automotive CEOs Of Our Time



hello I'm John Neff global editor in chief of motor one and welcome to this week's edition of the motor 1.com podcast this week we lost a giant of the auto industry Lee Iacocca a veteran of both Ford and Chrysler Iacocca stamped his mark on both automakers giving one and enduring icon and saving the other from the brink he was considered one of the greatest CEOs in any industry and on this episode we'll be discussing his legacy in some of our other favorite automotive CEOs joining me as motor 1.com senior editor and serial non complainer Greg Fink how are you Greg great how you doing John good good I'll explain that later by the way also with us and for the first time ever is motor 1.com Latino managing editor simón gómez how are you doing Simon I'm doing great how are you John I'm very happy to be here yeah it's exciting to have you on and it's a great time to let our listeners and the readers of motor 1 know that we just launched this new edition motor 1.com Latino that you are leading can you tell us a little bit about it is online brain now we have a whole bunch of content very good very curated very high-quality content mostly our adapted notes from the US sister site and but we're going to start doing our other things as well soon enough and and we're I have a team of writers there that I'm very proud of they're very good these two guys got real here in Miami and Francisco in bonus itis they're you know hitting it out of the park constantly and consistently so I am very happy and I am very optimistic of over going yeah I'm really excited to I've been in this industry a long time and and I have worked on a lot of different country editions of car websites when I was at Auto Blog we had international versions and of course at motor one we have eleven eleven now international editions of motor one written in ten languages but this one is most exciting to me just because I know that Hispanic community in the US is crazy about cars and we've really been able to write for them until now yes we are so this shouldn't this shouldn't be confused with motor 1.com Spain which we also have it is also in Spanish but that's all about the Spanish market over in Europe this is all about the US market this is a spanish-language version of motor 1 us and you guys have been doing a great job so far it launched a couple weeks ago and like you said your team is hitting it out of the park with keeping up with the content that the English language us Edition is producing and making sure that that same content gets out to the spanish-speaking audience as quickly as possible and yeah you're right we're gonna get into some original content soon so so yeah it's exciting and it's great to have you on the podcast I hope this will be the first of many appearances opposite to okay so let's let's hop into the big news of this week which is sad it just happened last night the night before we're recording and and it was Lee Iacocca's passing he was 94 which is a ripe old age and and certainly a well life lived for one that's gone as long as that when I was reading about him today it was crazy because I read he joined Ford Motor Company in August of 1946 that's how long he's basically been in the auto industry which is crazy so let me let me go through kind of the greatest hits of his career and then we'll talk him talk about kind of its effect you know his significance and and some stuff that were particularly impressed by so he joined Ford and he kind of rose through the ranks very quickly he started an engineering actually but then he moved over to sales and marketing what he's most famous for at Ford was the Ford Mustang I mean without this guy we wouldn't have the Mustang we wouldn't have the whole pony car segment that survives to this day that segment has kind of waxed and waned but right now I would say it's at a high-water mark and that you know we owe that star to him after he left Ford and he kind of left Ford because of some differences he had with Ford management particularly Henry Ford the second when he left Ford was doing great huge off at the URI left and it was just it sounds like personal differences Chrysler quickly recruited him snapped him up part of his story this amazing part of historia is that he took some projects from Ford that no one at Ford wanted to do and since he was put in charge of Chrysler he have basically the green light to do them and he brought over some of his cohorts from Ford to do that two things in particular are part of his legacy over at Chrysler one is introducing the kei car which spawned many variants and is one of the things that brought Chrysler back from the brink in the early 80s the second is the minivan he brought the idea of the minivan over from Ford where it was kind of laughed off and and disregarded and he launched it at Chrysler with the Dodge Caravan and Plymouth Voyager in the early 80s and it's interesting that just a few weeks ago Chrysler debuted a version of the Chrysler Pacifica minivan called the Chrysler Voyager so it's it's interesting that they brought that name back from the original minivan these were two great things that he brought to Chrysler again these castoffs from Ford he also did another a couple other things that Chrysler that I don't think many people remember as well one is that he got a bailout from the US government think the late seventies or very early 80s for Chrysler they were on the brink of bankruptcy and he basically made the argument that Chrysler is too big to fail that is an argument that wasn't used again until about 2008 when both GM and Chrysler had to use it again at the beginning of the Great Recession to be bailed out by the US government so he kind of set that precedent the other thing and this is perhaps the most significant thing he did for Chrysler that I don't think people talk about enough is Chrysler bought AMC when he was leaving the company when they did that they acquired Jeep as well and right now Jeep is the crown jewel of Chrysler it is perhaps the most valuable brand that the company has and that all happened during his tenure at the company during the 80s and probably the LAT the very last thing he did which you really can give him credit for other than giving it a rubber-stamp is that on his way out the door he gave Bob Lutz permission to go ahead with the Viper that was in the early 90s that was kind of one of one of the last things he did really an amazing career and then of course he's written books about his management and running companies and in business in America and so he's famous for that as well so what do you guys think you know having gone through his litany of accomplishments what do you think is the most significant thing in that that list Greg I'm gonna go with that we're looking at the guy who I think invented the crossover Mustang what was that just a regular family sedan with a sports car crossover been the minivan what was that just a big van mixed with a wagon crossover so every but you know crossover we see today owes a legacy to Lee Iacocca I think well he definitely thought outside of the vehicle segments right he was I think I think you're right you could look at him as the guy who was looking for white space in the industry and then would would help create a car to fill that space the minivan is a perfect example and the Mustang – what about you Simon what stands out in his resume – well I think that Greg forgot about another crossover that that Iacocca invented which is the Lincoln Continental my three he just got a Thunderbirds laptop rolls-royce grille and on his front and crossover but seriously I think the Mustang the Mustang is is gonna be his more lasting legacy is the thing that everybody remembers him from he it was his his drive his his energy the one that that made this car happen he put together this group of thinkers among in the former company that was known as the Fairlane hoc committee the used to meet weekly almost secretly at first and and they were trying to figure out what was gonna be the the nest next big thing in the 1960s that the newer generations were very very different and they sit down and they figure out and they heated out of the park they made this thing that that that was a cultural revolution you know the the the arrival of the Formosa the market was something very different not not like anybody had ever seen before people breaking the windows and the showrooms sleeping inside the cars fist fighting each other for the right to buy a single example and the dealership goes were that's what the first weeks of the Muslims were like and and they end up you know selling four times as many cars as they were expecting to sell the most optimistic projections that were nothing that I wanted to mention about Lee Iacocca is that his maybe not as nice but in 1995 three years after he left Chrysler he joined Kirk Kerkorian the famous corporate raider they try to to make a hostile takeover of the company which was repealed successfully by Chrysler but in my opinion the opinion of many and I'm not very original saying this but it was this this attempt to take over Chrysler what push them into the hands off of them their Bandstand and you know I'm not gonna go into that history but but we all then a and then after that Chrysler has had a string of owners yet we're partners that it's really of course you know right now it's with Fiat and as is humming along fairly well but yeah you're right that that is something yeah there were some there were some dark spots in in his career well he was a coward yeah I was just gonna say he was that Ford when the Pinto scandal happened with you know when it was found they could basically ignite from rear-end collisions because of the the fuel filler neck would detach from the fuel tank so and then we already mentioned the bailout you know it's it's not not exactly a great mark on your record when you're kind of the first businessman to go hat in hand to the US government asking for a bailout but that's what happens when these companies get so big you know one thing I always remember about the Mustang in particular is how popular it was when it the original forecast for and I think it was you know like the 1964 and a half or whatever the first year was was one hundred units sold in the first year that was what they were targeting they passed that in three months the the end by the end of the year they had sold three hundred and eighteen thousand that would be an amazing amount today where people probably buy more a lot more cash than they did of the mid sixties but that's how popular this thing was and you're right like people waiting in line and and you know being crazy for this car it also was one of those cars that created a new segment where Ford's competitors immediately had to enter with something you know and thus were born Camaro and Challenger and and other cars from now-defunct brands that were trying to recreate the success so yeah just there's not many people who have had as big a mark on the auto industry as well as done it twice at two different automakers that's I think what is most impressive to me but it also got me thinking today about CEOs in general and I think for the most part in the auto industry CEOs aren't usually well-known especially to like just average people out there maybe if you're a real diehard automotive enthusiast you could name the CEOs from from the major automakers but normally they're a little bit behind the scenes but even if they are behind the scenes sometimes there still have a major impact on these companies and and I still have some of my you know some that stuck out to me as as really significant or my favorites so I wanted to talk about who who our favorite automotive CEOs are so Simon why don't you start who's who's the ones that year the six out of your mind sighs Lee Iacocca yeah I don't have to go back to Ford and I would say that Alan Mulally he's one of the unsung heroes of the last recovery he managed to avoid go into bankruptcy in to save the company which he found in a horrible horrible shape I remember that and of and avoid going to you know avoid going to the government like Lee Iacocca did I mean he was Ford was the only domestic automaker to avoid having to go through that process you know is the only one left but Mullaly had many many qualities that there are very contradictory what with but we have in our minds have you know the the uber macho automotive CEO with the cigar in his mouth just like Iacocca was he was a social person he he wore leather vests he he didn't were pinstripe suits he was very approachable I remember talking to him when more than one occasion during the Auto Show he's just was there walking around looking at things talking to people and he had a very methodical approach to management he made a lot with people he made them go over and over things until no errors were left in whatever it was that they were doing and he I think that that he's only failure apparently for you know just judging by the last few years at four is that that when he left that culture left with him and and and the old way of doing things there seems to be back in full force but but I think it's a fantastic guy he did great things before he put them back in play in a way that many people were thinking was impossible I remember I was in New York and in the other show maybe in 2000 and he was hiring 2008 in six I believe so this probably was in 2005 and this very super famous old-school car journalist which I'm not going to mention was talking to somebody and I was eavesdropping as I should have and and he was saying that what this guy would a leader about to hire he's gonna be there just liquidate the company and save as much money for the company as possible I was heartbroken because I'm you know coming from such a giant figure this this this declaration I completely believed in oh my god this is this is horrible that what's happened unfortunately that wasn't the case he did exactly the contrary he saved the company and for his is lucky to have had him I hope they they bring back his his lessons and start doing things the right way again what I remember from Mullally is that he came in yeah like he said in 2006 and had a lot of dismantling to do because Ford had just gotten very bloated what I remember some of his biggest moves were was getting rid of the what was a the premier auto group selling Jaguar selling Land Rover selling Aston Martin selling Volvo and reducing Ford stake in maza so he really just you know focused the company down to its core brand and you can you imagine that he even wanted to kill Lincoln but and and and the family then let him but can you imagine if Mullally had come too far in an era like full prosperity maybe in in by the time the Jag Nasser got there and had all these properties the things that he could have done that the the company that fort could have been if he got cut in there when the cows were fat and and and money was plentiful instead he had to sell all these properties which I don't know maybe maybe that was the right move under any circumstance who knows well I think that's why I think that's why he brought why they brought him in I think he was the kind of CEO you bring in when you need to cost cut costs and shrink down to a manageable lean size so I don't I don't know that's a good good what if experiment a thought experiment to think about if he had come in when the the money was flowing and didn't have to cut nameplates what would he would what would he have done but remember he came from Boeing that's what made him perfect was Boeing was you know a large company that manufactured a very complicated product which is exactly what Ford was as well different industries but a lot of crossover he came from blame driving a Lexus that's right yeah he got some flack for it team before you I switched to a Ford product yeah wonderful he drives today though I like tuned I don't know that's a good question yeah I'd like to peek in his garage Greg what about you I am not as savvy when it comes to CEOs I am with the products they sell but you know being in the sinister you pay attention and I don't know if I have a favorite CEO but someone who has continued to impress me and I think will look back on as being a really good leader is Akio Toyoda Toyota and he's been there for about a decade now and we've just watched Toyota go from a once really giant Japanese automaker to a little bit of a lull period in the early to mid 2000 safe for the hybrids which is a really big thing too right now coming very strong you know they've got Supra so they're doing deals with BMW they've got this new electric platform coming out with Subaru this company went from just being kind of what's gonna happen its products aren't quite where they used to be to wow they're really looking toward the future yeah Akio Toyoda is an interesting choice definitely I think more of a lesser-known CEO at least in in the u.s. compared to some of the the domestic automakers CEOs but I would give him credit because he came in where I would say Toyota was at the top of its game a powerhouse and he really he hasn't let it slip too much I think you know that's the the danger of the risk when you come in after somebody has built the company up to an amazing size and it's doing so well and basically you have everything to lose and he's really kind of I think held the bar for Toyota you know I don't think Toyota has it hasn't really been anyone's most exciting company automaker in the last ten years maybe they're getting back to that with the Supra and you know they've won Lamar a couple times now so you know they stay in it but he's really I think steered the ship and kept it on track and not really lost much ground if any that were built up before he got there so yeah that's a decent choice well the other thing too is he's a race you know he races privately I don't know if privately is the right term but I'm sure he's paying money to race you know it's not he's the greatest race car driver but he enjoys racing cars so you can see with Supra eight-six you know he enjoys passion in cars but he's also able to see where money can be made so he understands a Camry still needs to be a Camry and the new camera is better than a lot of pascam so it's clearly getting a little more passion in those cars to you but there is a line where it's like yeah it would be nice if every car drove like an eight-six but the reality is that's not necessary where the money is and I like that he's a guy who kind of could see we're like ok let's throw passion into this project and this is a project where it's here to make money let's make it a great car for what the consumer in that segment wants yeah that's a great point I always respect the CEO that that uses their cars especially when they they race them and and that's definitely a more intimate way of knowing your product then you know like saying Alan Mulally where you're describing the car to and from work and your last car was a was you know with competitors so yeah that's a great choice so my choice is I don't know you're either gonna I think my choice is lame or brilliant so I'm gonna pick Elon Musk even though I don't even know that most people would consider him an automotive CEO because he came from the tech world having been a co-founder of PayPal yes he's the CEO of Tesla but he's also the CEO of SpaceX and a bunch of other companies so he's really not a typical automotive CEO that's one of the things I think is interesting to watch him operate in this automotive industry in ways that are just so strange and foreign and different than what we've seen automotive CEOs do in the past I also think it's a it's it's so fascinating to see a CEO that's very similar to like a Steve Jobs operating in the automotive space and you were talking Simon a little bit before about like when the Mustang debuted and people were lined up around the corner I think not III don't know if this has happened since then except for Tesla where people are as excited about a car as they were for you know the next iPhone when Steve Jobs was alive for better or worse I think he has that quality of creating a reality distortion field around his company and his products and what he does and if Steve Jobs had the same thing and you know that is a for better or worse because it creates a whole giant group of fanboys that that basically love the company the product and the man without question and blindly and that's not good I mean every company should be considered with some level of objectivity but at the same time he's also annoyed and angered people where people just write him off and his company because they don't like him and and I don't like that either I think it's you know I think if he's fascinating to observe I don't see the company as heading for utter failure nor do I see the company as the greatest thing ever and will overtake the entire industry in two years I'm more of a this is an amazing thing that's happening I'm gonna enjoy observing it and we'll see where the next year leads us but it has been he has been a fascinating CEO to watch as he runs this car company created from scratch unlike any car company that's run today I found a very very interesting do you know who he reminds me of the first the first Henry Ford because like I said he creo here in this comfort from nothing he he's a larger-than-life personality he is used to have his way on things for barrel wars and he's a giant and personality it's like it's it reminds me a lot of Henry for the first and and who knows maybe that's that's that's we can I have a consequence eventually you him I don't know if this is gonna be the the equivalent of what for more formal company wasn't the first couple of decades of the 20th century but but but but it's the revolution represents is kind of analog to that I think well and what I think is interesting is that the company is so wound up with the man right like you can't separate Elon Musk from Tesla and his words his actions have material effects on how people view the company the stock price whether or not the cars are bought like that type of figure doesn't come around very often in any industry I don't know that it's I mean maybe it hasn't been in the automotive industry since sin Henry Ford what you know the first or the second but you know so it like I said fascinating to watch you're either a lover or a hater but you know time will continue to tell whether this man's a genius or or a carnival barker and I like to think of whether he'll be John DeLorean or he'll be Steve Jobs whoa that's right John DeLorean is a great great name to bring up when we're talking about CEOs because that's the that's a guy who's probably would you'd put on the list of worst automotive CEOs of all time he was president he actually had a different CEO but he was president of DeLorean Motor Company a fair fair distinction but I would say even work founder there was a difference CEO of DeLorean even though he made very poor choices you can't deny that he passionately wanted his company to survive and he was willing to illegally sell drugs to make that happen so you know there was passion there just a little misplaced so very good discussion I want to I want to keep moving though and there was some a couple interesting pieces of card news that I think are worth talking about the first is an extension of our last podcast discussion which was all about the Camaro and the news that the Camaro might die after the 2023 model year we've had some speculation that that if it goes away it may come back as an all-electric pony car the the the reasoning for this the the argument is somewhat thin however there's I'll try to lay it out as clearly as I can for one one of the the lead product managers for Camaro was moved over to the electric car division at GM so they've kind of moved a performance guy over into the electric car division and one would think that him bringing that expertise there means that there's going to be an electrified performance product and that could come be you know be with the name Camaro the the other the other thing is that we we all seem it seems to be somewhat certain that the that GM has no plans for the current Camaro after 2023 and basically the platform it's on the Alpha platform is what GM considers a legacy platform that it's that it's going to stop supporting at some point they will have a rear-wheel drive platform after that it'll be one of four platforms it doesn't seem likely that it's going to be used you know for another big v8 honking muscle car so I you know whether or not this is true I don't know and I don't I don't think it's way too early for any of us to argue whether whether it is or not however I keep coming around to this idea of electric muscle cars and the reason is because while Ford will be bringing a hybrid Mustang they will be building a Mustang and I inspired electric crossover and Dodge has publicly talked about the only way to add more power to the Challenger is to make it a hybrid to add electrification and then we've got this speculation about the Camaro and remember Chevy did produce an electric Camaro there's the Eco PO which is the electric Camaro drag drag car they've dabbled in it do you think that the muscle car fanatics out there the buyers the the real loyal people who are buying Mustangs Camaros and challengers right now could ever get behind electric versions of those cars I have a hard time believing that that is going to be an easy transition Greg what do you think they're gonna have to I think at a certain point most vehicles are gonna be electric but I don't know if it's gonna need to happen very quickly I still don't you know I take this report with a grain of salt this was a lot of hay we saw a guy move over to here used to be there and thus that guy was on that so maybe he's part of this and thus the Camaro might now be electric and electric crossover and it could be as you said Ford has said that they are gonna make a electric crossover inspired by the Mustang so wouldn't surprise me if Chevy goes a similar route but I don't think that means this is going to necessarily overshadow the entire Camaro could Camaro could die but Camaro could live sub you know at the same time I think it won't be a drastic switch I don't think all of a sudden in like 2025 we're gonna go from v8 powered Camaros and Mustangs to all-electric Camaros and Mustangs I think electric electrification will sneak in like it is very soon with like a hybrid Mustang or like in a challenger with some type of an electric assistance to get more torqued like in a drag race mode or something like that automakers are gonna have a really hard business case to keep producing VA it's just for your Mustangs your Camaros and your challengers I would say you know rather than go from v8 turbo turbo v6 'iz and and to keep modifying that you know if you look at it from the sense of well if we want the fastest cars if that's what is important about muscle cars I don't know maybe going all-electric right away is a good plan because I mean look at look at the Tesla's out there that are some of the fastest cars in the world and they're not even supercard as they're sedans you know you throw that a powertrain like that into a muscle car and you could have incredible quarter-mile times incredible lap times but the thing is I you know I feel like there's so much emotion and image tied up in a v8 burble with a muscle car that I just I just don't know if that that that circle can be squared with those buyers what do you think Simon I don't know well change is always painful and I will never forget like I was and in a reunion of on a meeting of some Corvette club in the middle of Florida and somebody was saying that he would never again buy a Corvette because they didn't have around the new one the c7 they have roan has like real lights but apart from that I think that that Chevy if this if this is true of this this has any any semblance of truth they could be onto something you know because while Chrysler or Dodge and Ford are going at it gradually creating first you know hybrid versions that probably plug-in hybrid versions until the eventually electric pony car happens Chevy would I bleep frog them with their electric Camaro and and and and we'll probably get some advantage there over them I don't if I'm making any sense but you are but and I let me take it one step further in that like right now I think we are we are in the midst of a muscle car horsepower war imagine if these cars were electric and that power war were happening like I mean we're talking easily nine second quarter mile time straight from the factory like like that's what these cars could do with that amount of power that amount of torque and zero rpm all that all of that stuff I mean we would be seen probably the fastest most fun to drive muscle cars we've ever seen out of the switch – I have zero that's about it I just I just think that that there's some there's gonna be some resistance I don't think it's gonna be significant to be honest people are going to love that eventually in the younger people don't live that way as they should that's true that's true I mean look it also depends on on some of the other numbers you know like range and and battery recharge time and all of those things that I think most automakers besides Tesla haven't really figured out the right equation for you know so far we're getting a lot of sub 250 mile range electric cars and until you get I think the 300 mile capable ones like people just have a hard time seeing them as anything more than a second car maybe that's okay if you're if you're buying it as a muscle car but and also yeah like and also first charging times fast charging times yeah I don't know if I don't know maybe they will have you know a digital soundtrack to recreate the sound v8 engine or something and and I could see I I would bet if they did that they would go so far as to like make some kind of weight in the car like vibrate to make you like your engines idling I could see them going so far just to have like oh I wouldn't mind that he wouldn't like that at all yeah that would be hilarious so the the other piece of news is about the Corvette and the final c7 seventh generation Corvette has been built and it just went up for auction for charity at barrett-jackson northeast auction and it's sold for a record 2.7 million dollars now that's a record for a car sold for charity at auction and we we've seen this happen tons of times where an automaker will auction off either the first car ever like they just auctioned off the first Supra of the latest generation or the auction off the last one but 2.7 million is like two and a half times the highest price I've ever seen for for one of these cars and I'm shocked by it because it's just the last car of a generation and there's gonna be another Jenner like it is not like the last Corvette ever nor is it like that you know nor was the c7 like the be-all end-all of Corvette generations so I don't I don't really I can't really understand why it went to 2.7 well this is though is that is the last for an engine Corvette in a while yes that is its claim to fame the last front engine Corvette because we have the mid-engine one replacing it as the eighth generation so I guess I guess that's the good a reason as any maybe it will do you think it'll keep that value though at 2.7 million I know but if the tax write-offs good enough you know there was a charitable donation it is a terrible donation and I believe that the the charity I forget the name but it goes to building houses for severely injured veterans so a great cause and I'm super happy they got 2.7 million and maybe the guy who bought it doesn't care what it's worth and knows it'll probably have a significant value but just wanted to make a really big donation to a great cause but oh that that was I was shocked when the gavel fell at 2.7 million all right well we'd love to hear what you think about the stories we've been talking about specifically about Lee Iacocca if anybody has if you have some great stories or comments on the life and career of Lee Iacocca we'd love to hear them you can find us on Facebook and Twitter at motor 1.com or you can visit us on our website motor 1.com where you can talk to us in the comments coming up we're gonna find out what we've all been driving this week but before the break a reminder that if you're listening to this online you can also get our show on iTunes Apple podcast google podcasts and Spotify so please subscribe so that you're sure to get the next episode when it comes out during the next part of the show we're going to talk about what cars we're driving this week and today I'm going to start with you Greg and the reason I refer to you as a serial non complainer is that you had a car that was definitely worth complaining about this week and I didn't hear a peep from you so tell us what you were driving I am driving the 2019 Mitsubishi Mirage and it is a mirage of what you think a good car is supposed to be and then you're getting it you realize it's not that good it's fine enough it's a car let me let me let me ask a couple questions what is the as-tested price I want to say sixteen thousand nine hundred something that's actually more than I thought yeah it is not as cheap as you would expect considering only a seventy eight horsepower oh my god I've been should be like a law against that like that that does not seem safe on us roads it doesn't feel very safe I hate to say that I mean it's fun to drive in its own weird way because it's very light and it you know everything kind of moves in a gentle slow like be really fun to rallycross I feel like because it's slow enough to not get in too much trouble and it's like the suspensions very cushy so it probably handled bumps really well if I could find one for cheap with a stick shift this one's got the CVT in it I would be buying one tomorrow just as a rallycross toy is it is it a weird colour no it's white on black with black wheels it actually it looks pretty good it got a facelift I want to say 2018 and the car looks actually pretty good right now for what it is it's not as dopey-looking as it looked when it first came here I don't know if I'm if I'm gonna drive a car that cheap and that small I think I would rather take $16,000 and import the Tata Nano from like India and drive around in a super rare super cool cheapest you know crazy cheap car the Mitsubishi it's just I haven't I haven't driven one I you know I I hear about when some people buy them and they get they get you know ribbed on for buying it and you know I usually i usually say my philosophy is that most cars for sale today are good like when we review cards it's not separating the bad cars from the good cars it's usually trying to distinguish the great cars from the good cars but there are still a few cars that just aren't good and this seems to fall below that line so are you reviewing it yes and I would say this it's a car it's good enough if for whatever reason they approve your credit or the dealer's selling them for cheap if this is what you can get it gets the job done it's got a/c it's got cruise control it's got like a touchscreen you know infotainment system with apple carplay that said if you're paying full price there are a lot of other much better cars for 16:9 there's a lot better used cars for 69 I mean just good it is nice that it has a full warranty and it's it's got a tiny three cylinder engine but in theory it gets like 40-something miles per gallon on the highway I'm defending what really isn't that defensible at this price but I understand that some people want that warranty and maybe this dealer will give them with their credit you know what they have that builder like we'll get you in to Mirage or it's 7,000 dollars off sticker so you're actually paying 8k but it's sticker it's tough to argue yeah yeah I'll be interested to see what your score is on our ten point scale for the review if it if it beats five I'll be impressed five out of ten all right Simon how about you what have you been driving this week Simon has been driving a Nissan Altima sv with pro pilot and his basic transportation are 219 version means is there's I love you like go ahead sorry I kind of feel like that I kind of feel like the current Altima is the camry of our age like the camry the current camry has gotten so wild in its design that i just don't look at it as that basic transportation anymore like you have to be okay with it's polarizing design but then I look at the Altima and the ultimate to me is like that every man's car that you know you just drive if you kind of don't care and and I don't know maybe that sounds like a slight but you can sell a lot of those cars know that other people out there and you that's exactly what a basic car what needs at once actually yeah and in in Disgaea I did their cells I've been growing and growing they gave it this pleasing styling that is not generic it's a bit of personality to it and and and I like it I enjoy it and and the interior is very nice as it's years ahead of what needs I'm used to do inside cut their cars it has a very pleasing almost German feel to it and a propeller works just fine just fine so and and and the CVT is completely offensive you don't realize is there which is fine that you mean maybe other CVT is I've gotten a lot better yeah oh my god yes they have there used to be terrible like like every city that's this technology as time progresses technology things to get better so and is the ultimate you're driving all-wheel-drive because that's new no it's not sadly this okay yeah it feels like though so that's that's a good part if you'd like to ask ask Nissan what the take rate is for all-wheel drive on the on the new Altimas just it just to see if it's was worth adding so okay well that's a that's a I was gonna say that's an interesting car but it's not really an interesting car it's it's kind of like the Mirage it's a car but yeah though I said with Greg ins and I wanted to jump out yeah no that's good I think I think you probably got the better end of that deal so so the car I'm driving this week is a little different than what you guys are driving I have the keys to a McLaren 720's Spyder and this this car breaks records for me in terms of cars that I've driven or EV have been loaned for review it is both the most powerful at well over 700 horsepower and the most expensive at four hundred and eleven thousand dollars so it has been it has been actually quite terrifying to drive the car to back it's been terrifying to back it out of my driveway because I have a thin driveway with a brick wall on one side and the last thing I want to do is like you know ripoff sideview mirror and then fortunately it comes with a little button you press to raise the suspension when when you're like you can only press it below 40 miles an hour it'll raise the suspension so you can like pull in your driveway or whatever and I basically I have to use it to get out of my driveway and then any like parking lot I pull into you anytime I pull off the main road I gotta hit it again to you know just make sure I don't scrape the the front lip spoiler on something but look it's amazing it is I haven't I haven't had a chance to find a safe space to you know really put my foot down but what little I have been able to do is if the car is telepathic it it this the steering is instant and accurate and full of communication the the you know the engine is like I said I haven't there's so much power I barely tapped into it just driving around actually I took a grocery shopping and there is no trunk but there is a Franck and it's actually a pretty big front trunk so it took all of my groceries but obviously like you know like I said I couldn't really dip into the engine what has surprised me so far is that just tooling around town in the normal suspension setting it is actually pretty comfortable that the suspension is not punishing at all it's actually pretty compliant like this is this is in insane to say but like I could daily drive this if I had more money than I knew what to do with but I could drive this every day it's not that hard to get in and out of considering what it is there's you know that it has the kind of scissor doors and you have to get over a little bit of a sill but it's not like getting into a BMW i8 which is the most ungraceful thing you could do much easier to get into into and out of this and all the controls are either drop rate like it really was actually pretty easy to get in and drive around so I have it over this holiday weekend and I'm gonna go to some barbecues with it it has attracted crowds wherever I've gone at the grocery store people came up to me and and actually even just in my driveway people have just walked up my driveway and started talking to me about this car so it's been an experience you know it's it's so outlandish $411,000 you know to review it is ridiculous because it's not like somebody who buys it is gonna read a car magazine and say oh I think I'm gonna spend my $411,000 on that instead of the $411,000 Ferrari because of what this guy said but is it is just an experience like like no other I've driven some expensive cars before and some fast cars and this is at the very top of that list so it'll be interesting we're gonna have a review of it coming up pretty soon so we'll be I'll be interested to see what that scores on the ten-point scale definitely I'm thinking above a 5 so all right well that is it for this episode of the motor 1 podcast you can follow Greg at the thinker on Twitter and assignment I forgot to get your Twitter handle I do have one that you can share yes my to have those simón gómez feet is a matrix inside mo and g om VZ v great and you can follow me on twitter at john underscore m underscore Neff I want to thank you two for joining me on the podcast today thank you thanks John for having me you're welcome and thanks of course for everyone out there listening and we'll talk to you next week you

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