See Through Model Rocket Engine Burning in 4K Slow Motion – Rockets (S1 • E1)

See Through Model Rocket Engine Burning in 4K Slow Motion – Rockets (S1 • E1)


We make a See Through Model Rocket Engine to film the inner workings in 4k Slow Motion and Ultra Slow Motion. these are standard estes model rocket engines found everywhere on the planet and i always wanted to see how the burn, i figured i would cut one in half rig it and film it in slow motion and it looked really cool and definitely educational.

Program Guide Below:

►► 01:46 1st Burn 4K – 1500 Frames Per Sec
►► 03:35 2nd Burn 4000 Frames Per Sec
►► 05:09 3rd Burn 4K – 1500 Frames Per Sec.

Things to Notice: How the 2 stages of the rocket burn differently.

Links to subjects we addressed or referenced in this episode:

Free Jet Boundary :

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Special Thanks to:

Vision Research and Fletcher Jones Imports for your continued support.

► ►►Other videos you may like:

See Through Engine In Slow Motion:

Inside An Engine – in 4K Slow Motion [ Quick Clip ] :

Dog Drinking Water Differently in 4K Slow Motion:

Please leave any opinions suggestions or comments Below and don’t forget to check out our other videos and subscribe , we have many more videos on the way. Thank you.

Watch this in 4k whether you have a 4k tv or not, it looks incredibly insane, in a good way. its awesome !

Directed By: Matt Mikka

Carbon 12

Matt Mikka
m

100 Comments on "See Through Model Rocket Engine Burning in 4K Slow Motion – Rockets (S1 • E1)"


  1. That was really cool. The second half rocket was a good example of what got Challenger. Your oring blew.

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  2. There are certainly a lot of challenges in engineering this video. First of all, the rear part of a solid rocket engine has a venturi made of ceramic to both accelerate the thrust while withstanding the heat factor of solid rocket fuel (in this case, black powder). You might try using actual a Pyrex glass remnant sealed with some type of ceramic and epoxy sealer, it just might give you the flameproofing that you're looking for.

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  3. Fun video. When I was in grade school, Estes sold a clear sided engine where the colored the propellant, smoke charge and the ejection charge. Back then the used a paper cap to retain the ejection charge that was like loose pellets. Now I think it's more of a clay cap.

    Wanted to show an engine burning for a science project. Never happened. Teachers freaked at having it indoors. Was in a plexiglass case with squirrel cage blower to exhaust the smoke out a dryer tube threw an open window.

    I was wondering how you were going to cut the engine in half. Was wincing as you started up the table saw. Was sure there would be enough friction heat to ignite the propellant. Looks like it did scorch the the end of the casing.

    The C6-7 has s 7 second smoke delay, a C6-3 would shorten the high speed filming. Another fun project would be to use a 1st stage booster engine like a C6-0. Would show how they blow burning propellant out the back of the engine to start the second engine that would be taped to it in the second stage of the rocket.

    I fired more engines connected to a bench vise than my parents ever cared to know about. Also had a D series engine that wouldn't ignite with normal igniters. Removed the block of propellant from the paper casing and set it on top of a burning barrel with a fire. When it all burned at once, made a huge mushroom cloud of smoke.

    There is a fascination in messing with these. Looking forward to your Parr 2.

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  4. you could take a acrylic tube and an oxygen tank and make a rocket engine in which you could see it clearly

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  5. YouTube suggested this video to me after watching "Amy Schumer Gets Heckled in Stockholm" because both videos are in the category of "sick burn". You get a subscribe; she does not.

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  6. Mad respect ✊ still doing interesting stuff mate looks like you haven't had to go into slow mo porn 👌

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  7. next time glue the damn things down to prevent the gasses from going completely out the sides. u get a better test

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  8. Love the idea of splitting the rocket in half and placing it on clear perspex. I think it would of worked better if the rocket (side) was better sealed to the perspex, maybe with hot glue around the edge of it, or even sealed onto the perspex in a block of epoxy resin.
    Also i would be interested if someone could explain the appearance of those pieces of burning fuel appearing to be shooting towards the camera.

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  9. Watch the small fireball from 3:37 to 3:47. It pass through the powder very quick, reach the walls of the rocket and look like to follow it until it pass between the rocket structure and the transparent glass of the experiment. Then it bounces on a kind of ciment they put to enclose the rocket.

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  10. Thank you for this really great slow motion video of something I too found really interesting.

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  11. I am wondering if this is not quite a good visual. Very cool but I think the motor is burning "all at once" because of the air gap between the plexiglass and the motor. It's should burn from tear to front

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  12. The footage of the igniter wire melting from the heat @ 2:00 was incredible! You guys are the best slow-mo channel ever!

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  13. The Estes low power Black Powder rocket motors are "end burners". The burn starts at the nozzle end and burns the propellant uniformly up the casing length. Then they have a delay element that burns at a constant rate to the ejection charge. High Power Ammonium Percolate motors are typically "core burners" where there is a hollow core the length of the motor that is ignited and burns from the inside of the propellant to the outside. Though a core burner type of motor can also be made up of several propellant "grains" that will also burn at each end as the core burns. (This is essentially what the Shuttle solid rocket boosters are.)

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  14. Have you considered using a clear plexiglass tube for your rocket engine? Somehow unwrapping it and making a snug fit so you get that propulsion flame you so wanted.

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  15. As a rocketeer, get it right-there's three phases. The first phase is thrust-the flame coming out. Then the delay, with a smoke tracking charge, then the ejection charge, out of the opposite end of the the thrust nozzle. Do your research dude…

    Reply

  16. First off, I notice the motor's not fully sealed against the acrylic, so the flames tend to shoot up and down as well as out the nozzle. I don't know if there's a way to seal it better, but it might help.
    More importantly, a model rocket engine has a few sections of fuel. The initial launch fuel, a delay charge, and an ejector charge. In this video, they seem to burn all at the same time. In fact, I think the part to the left that's glowing is the delay charge. This also might be because the engine doesn't have a full seal with the acrylic so the fire can go through the gap between engine and acrylic and ignite the entire fuel faster.
    These are things to consider when you do this again.

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  17. if you run oxygen gas used for welding through a 2 inch cylinder of acrylic with a 3/4 hole drilled in it then light the end it turns into a rocket engine check out applied sciences channel for a proper explanation and demo

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  18. Epoxy the edges of the motor casing to the acrylic so it maintains proper chamber pressure and burns normally.

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  19. You've made my childhood memories flutter with excitement! Thank you! I couldn't believe how well this came out!

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  20. Gotta wonder how many of your neighbors are peeking out from behind the curtains overlooking that alley, saying "WTF is he up to now?"
    Great video! Glad the motor did not ignite when you cut it in half. I had my doubts when the steel blades hit the ceramic nozzle (could have caused sparks).

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  21. Cool video, but there's no need to flap your arms like you're a seagull going after a dropped donut.

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  22. Thanks for putting this on YouTube. I really enjoyed the video.

    I've been doing a thing with Cub Scouts and model rockets for a few years, and I always wanted a way to show the kids what's going on inside the engine. This is exactly what I've been looking for.

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  23. FIFTY-YEARS! Since the Summer of Love, 1967, when I first was introduced to model rocketry, I too have wondered, 'what is going on inside the engine'? Sniffing the engine afterwords – the mark of a true rocketeer! Thank you for answering a question I have pondered for half a century! As they said back then: Righteous, Brother!

    Reply

  24. sawing that bp made me cringe. but i guess the worst that could happen with black powder was a fire ball or small explosion…

    that aside, this representation of how the inside of a rocket motor burns is a little off.. the reason this is, is because as the bp burns the heat will travel down the side of the motor against the plexiglass and ignite the powder along the glass… you can see this happening with the entire side facing the glass burning at the same time. the burn should be more consistent from one end to the other.

    id like to suggest repeating this experiment with the only change being pressing your own rocket inside a thick wall acrylic tube. if you make it an end burning rocket with larger nozzle that should be safe enough to prevent a cato. feel free to message me for more info on pressing your own rocket.

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  25. Would have liked to see a slow mo of the jet head on or from an angle. Nice experiment though with the plexiglass

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  26. I think it would be be cool if you did a super slow motion of dripping cold water into vegetable oil

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  27. Cutting the motor with a power saw? You do know that the propellant is black powder don't you? Surprised it didn't ignite.

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  28. glass and epoxy the edges to force gasses out rear vs leaking around edges? cool vid

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  29. A lot of comments talking about not seeing it progress along its length but I am pretty sure they mostly burn inside to out not so much down to up down. This is I think how they get that initial impulse and then sustain it as more surface area of the burning material becomes available.

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  30. would you guys consider custom sound track for slow mo….I make killer atmosphere scores😎 nice channel by the way. instant sub

    Reply

  31. Hello Warped, Can I also be part of your "friend list" that you post in your videos description.I am also going to do it in my videos.It is hard for us, new channels to grow without any help.It would be really nice of you 🙂

    Reply

  32. Do this again but superglue the rocket engine to the acrylic. This way we can see the fuel burn normally then it coming out the sides. Looks awesome nonetheless

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  33. the back fire can be use to make chain reaction on a rocket so it fly longer and hopefully higher

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  34. Were those a couple of mach diamonds I saw at 5:21 and lasting about 3 seconds? I've seen enough images and videos to recognize mach diamonds in afterburner and rocket exhaust. However, I don't know enough about aerodynamics or model rockets to know if this engine would have sufficiently fast exhaust to have that effect.

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  35. If you're gonna do it.. do it properly. Obviously all the propellant was just blowing out the sides because the rocket wasn't sealed to the acrylic piece.. completely eliminating all the characteristics of a rocket engine. All we saw was the burning of the fuel but not the actual function of a rocket.

    Reply

  36. this isn't at all like the rocket would burn in normal use. the was no seal and the cut was rough.
    1. fine band saw
    2. thicker plexiglass
    3. glue tube and fuel to plexiglass for a better seal
    4. clamp down hard on tube to help keep it​ sealed.

    Reply

  37. It did not had good sealing and the energy spread around and got away from many corners and other sides of the rocket this may have produced a completely different result in the burning pattern I suggest you shoot an other video with better sealing so that you can maintain the pressure inside the rocket's body

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  38. Thank you me and my son are building a rocket and got curious about how engines work. And look what we found, you. Thanks for doing the dangerous part for us.

    James and rocky.

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  39. Ok cool exactly what i wanted to no,alot of people make rockets and drill a nossle all the way up near the other end usually stop just before ejection charge so thay recon this is how you should make them but seeing this as this is a professional made rocket answers alot of queries..;)im like this guy i have to no how things work and why….

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  40. Very Cool, Nice Video. Love your work. Would love to see more with different size motors

    Reply

  41. Кто блять русские субтитры делал? Покажите мне этого пидора!

    Reply

  42. I have never even heard of a problem from this BUT liquid N2 is colder than liquid O2. This means than LIQUID Oxygen will condense from surfaces cooled with liquid N2.

    Reply

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