How To Keep Your Bike Safe | A Guide To Preventing Bicycle Theft

How To Keep Your Bike Safe | A Guide To Preventing Bicycle Theft


Unfortunately, bikes and mountain bikes are sought after by thieves as they are hard to track and easy to move on. Here are some top tips on keeping your MTB safe and reducing the risk of theft as much as possible.

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100 Comments on "How To Keep Your Bike Safe | A Guide To Preventing Bicycle Theft"


  1. Somebody went in my bike store once to try steal my bike, unfortunately they never factored Missy my German Shepherd, the police came but the crim went off in a ambulance 🙂
    As people we cant inflict violence on people, but our pets can 🙂

    Reply

  2. one thing nobody think of ,, is LOCK YOUR TOOLS IN THE GARAGE ,, or shed if you have angle grinder bolt cuter hammers drill ,hacksaw , if you lock your bike ,, and give the thief your tool to use to hack your locks is stupid

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  3. Hands up of your feeling super paranoid about your bike being nicked after watching this 😂 🙋🏽‍♂️🙋🏽‍♂️🙋🏽‍♂️

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  4. just remove your two wheel and take your two wheel whit you on you ( no wheel no ride ) or sleep whit your bike 🙂

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  5. people NEED to use the home feature of strava to stop thieves identifying peoples locations and bikes from their strava account. recipe for disaster!

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  6. Step 1: own a really heavy bike Step 2: remove front and back wheel Step 3: chain wheels to yourself, bike will be completely theft proof.

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  7. The 6 dislikes are from bike thieves at home thinking “I would have gotten away with it, if it weren’t for those meddling kids and their Dodd.” 😂🐕

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  8. You should check out the lockpicking lawyer youtube channel for lock reviews. A lot of expensive lock have common security flaws and he is very good at exposing vulnerabilities

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  9. And then you have the guys stealing your brake levers, just the lever not the mount, when the bike is parked outside the local DIY market.
    I got out of the market, sat on the bike and it took me three seconds to realise that the levers are missing. I just grabbed the void and it felt wrong.
    Judging from the mess around the bike they must have had brake fluid all over them.
    So I went to the police, shocked the officer with how much two hydraulic brakes are worth, got to my bike shop and ordered new brakes. The insurance paid and I have a story to tell.
    It still puzzles me who does such a thing as stealing brake levers out of a hydraulic disc brake?

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  10. This is truly useful, as I've had my bike stolen 2 months ago which was locked in a town centre I only left it for a couple of minutes, someone else saw it locked aswell it only took them less then 3 minutes in the time they were gone, unfortunately I didn't get it back, I have a new bike now, I have done a couple of the suggestions like insurance, the second I got it and will be looking in to the getting the other one as well.

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  11. why are there no good tracking devices that can be placed in or on the bike?
    I've seen one in the USA but its aimed at car owners its called XY, if the shape was changed it would if in the bike???
    may be theres a bit of money to be had fixing this issue? Cheers doddy

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  12. You can get some really cool stand alone alarms, they will sound an alarm or send a text, but can be used for a single door, like for a shed.

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  13. Private Strava settings are a good idea. My bikes are insured through pedal cover, really good deal.

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  14. Great video as ever guys.
    Just one thing, the so-called thieves code is nonsense. I was serving policeman in west London for 15 years and every time these so called codes came up they turned out to be nothing of the sort.
    Snopes and the bbc have extensively explained why they’re nonsense here.
    It’s an urban myth.

    https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/grab-and-go-code-chalkers/

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/s/www.bbc.co.uk/news/amp/uk-england-hereford-worcester-35337747

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  15. If you need a big chain lock go to the hardware store and buy the amount of chain that you need and a heavy duty lock.
    Then put the chain threw a inner tube to protect your bike.

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  16. in my town, if you not careful enough, even US$10 or less worth bike could be stolen. what more my lil bro whose a police officer lost his bike in his home at resident area that quite considered as a safest area as army and police officers living around there.

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  17. I suggest watching bike lock videos on the LockPickingLawyer channel. He shows how bike locks can be defeated, which will help you pick one of the more secure locks.

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  18. The moment he told about the frame number I took some pictures of it with my ID next to it.
    SO, when someone steals my bike and it gets found I can prove it's mine.

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  19. Great video Doddy. Assetsure are really good for retro ‘collectibles’ if they’re garage queens and not ridden.

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  20. Nice content as always but watching this on my TV and the workshop camera is swaying slightly and a bit distracting.

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  21. Will CCTV actually help? I got a free camera with my home insurance but surely they'll just cover it up or unplug it.

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  22. #askgmbntech why does my tire rub on the fork under hard braking? I'm running 2011 Rockshox Recon TK SL forks and a specialised qr skewer.

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  23. How to avoid your bike getting stolen

    Step 1.. Have a bike that no one would want to steal

    Thats it

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  24. I'm lucky enough to never have had any of my families bikes stolen – My house insurance covers all bikes under £2,000 even away from our house but I did need to list my bike (serial number etc). We are covered by Marks & Spencer home insurance (underwritten by AXA I think). Whilst it did put my premium up by about £20 quid a month – I have the confidence that if any or all of our bikes were nicked they would pay out.
    It's definitely worth insuring your pride and joy.
    Hopefully you will never need to use the insurance but it is worth the peace of mind knowing that you are covered.
    Best wishes guys.
    Dan

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  25. I write my name, address, email, phone number, bike make, model and serial number on a water proof piece of paper. Then roll it up and put it inside the left grip or seat post. I do this for all of my bikes.

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  26. Get an Dobermann or another kind of guard dog.  Feel pretty secure with my bike when im away from it.

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  27. Great video, and also the first one I’ve seen that mentions DataTag. I have two of their stealth pro kits – good stuff!

    Some less common tips: if you decide to go for good-quality secondary security systems (Think Hexlox, Pitlock…), most will come with stickers. It pays to advertise with these on the one part a would-be-thief is sure to look at first – your D-lock body. If a quick glance at your lock also makes it clear that your bike is going to be that much more of a hassle to strip for parts or move, the angle grinder just might stay in the bag.

    Another thing that you can do is contact companies that sell custom flag + name bike frame stickers and ask them to print you a set of discreet ”registered and security marked” -ones. I had Flandria Bikes print me a set of these in Finnish a couple of years back and can’t recommend them enough – great quality. If you go this way, be sure to only advertise security that you actually have, though.

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  28. And i thought my bike is expensive but now i have to put same amount money for locks and chains and hire a military to protect my bike 😅

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  29. £3 rape alarms off eBay. I hook these on the inside of both my shed doors. Also a wireless motion sensor were the sensor is in the shed and the alarms plugged in by my bed. £15 off eBay.

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  30. I don't recommend making it hard for them, because if it's to hard they'll use violent methods. For example when thief's entered my house everything was in a safe or locked so they just waited for me to arrive and put a gun on my head, I gave them everything because life it's more important.

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  31. I stopped using roof racks on my car it’s a big sign outside you’re house saying I bike lives here to thieves.

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  32. I use Bikmo, you get a 50% discount on any extra bikes you insure above the first one, and you can get a discount of 5% by signing up from the link on moneysavingexpert.com – also don't forget bikeregister.com in the UK, all UK police forces use it.

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  33. Wow this is hard core paranoia get cctv get this like already don't live in big brother world

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  34. My Grandfather who lives in a small town in a mountain area once had his bike stolen. He was the type of person who remembers everything. 2 years after his bike was stolen, he saw a similar one while entering a grocery store. He looked at the frame number and instantly recognised as his bike. The bike was not locked up at all so he just took it a drove off. Thankfully, it was just a cheap city bike.

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  35. Like many other people have said get a cheap bike for doing commutes to work, school, pub etc… I got a bmx for £50 learnt some new skills and tricks at the same time👍

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  36. So I want to write vicious dog and poor people live here on my door. Haha

    Thankfully most of this isn’t relevant in America. Bike theft happens from bikes locked up on porches, from open garages, and mainly just from bike racks. I’m glad I do t live where you don’t have space for a proper two car garage.

    Homeowner insurance is changing, now you don’t have say a $1000 deductible, your deductible is a percentage of your insured value.

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  37. i am going to a resort for the first time in two weeks..(northstar tahoe). do you lock your bike up while eating lunch or visiting the bike shop ect?

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  38. You should do a video on security while away from home, one of my friends bike recently got stolen while locked on a roof rack while camping.. What would you suggest?

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  39. Never ever trust the gold, eleven star, whatever rating on the lock manufacturer's packaging. Instead do a quick lock-picking google-search on the particular lock and you'll info about its weak points. Thieves know them and will waste no time trying to saw through the gold rated hardened steel if it can be popped open with a simple shim.

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  40. I’m in a rented house and can’t really put in a proper ground anchor. Shed Shackle to the rescue!! £50 and basically reinforces your shed wall to allow you to chain the bike to it.

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  41. All excellent points and advice but the buck stops at a nearly impenetrable shed if you cant keep it in your house right next to your bed( where i keep mine), sturdy with a disc lock or two NO windows and concrete foundation that cant be dug under and motion activated siren stick ups that you can buy for under 30 dollars mounted on inside of shed door

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  42. Where do you guys put your lock after unlocking your bike? I wrap it on my seat tube, any other better suggestions

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  43. Unfortunately in my experience, bike thieves who go after high end bikes are usually the same people you share the trails with. I'm very wary of other random riders who eye my bikes but dont make eye contact or return pleasantries. Also, if some one approaches me and the first question is "that's a nice bike, how much does something like that go for?" Alarm bells go off and I head the other way. Thieves aren't always a stranger and often are friends of your friends or neighbors.

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  44. no dont listen to this guy otherwise i wouldnt get good deals at police auctions on top of the line mountain bikes but then again i can always buy bikes from bankruptcy auctions

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  45. Hidden motion sensing cameras, a coal black 120# dog that does NOT play well with strangers and the 2nd Amendment! Ones chances are better stealing a fresh snow bunny from a wolverine!👊☠️

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  46. Strava privacy zones! We had a couple of bikes nicked, pretty sure it was because of people seeing where we live on Strava.

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  47. Just another tip I recently learned myself.
    I bought my first car a few months ago, 1 of the main things it needed to have was a towing hook so I could put on a bike rack. Now it just so happens that the car I ended up buying has blinded rear windows. I also got lucky and when I put the rear seats down I can fit 1 of my bikes in the trunk if I take off a wheel or 2. With the blinded windows and doubling down on the cargo cover it's very tricky to spot my bike in my car. Not impossible to see I have a bike in my car but you would pretty much have to be looking for something in the car anyway, damn near impossible to casually walk by and see I have a bike in my trunk that's more expensive than the car it's in.

    TLDR: Keep your bike in your car and not on a rack (if possible) and + points for cargo covers and blinded windows!

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  48. My homeowners policy protects my bikes against theft (- deductible), but State Farm (USA) does offer a personal property policy that is comprehensive. The premiums are 10% of the value, however. If you have an entry-level to mid-range bike and your primary concern is theft, it may not be worth the additional premium for the comprehensive property. If however, you have 1 or more professional-grade or e-bikes and you take part in higher-risk riding or are riding in traffic (I know that there are several people that own both road and trail bikes), then the comprehensive policy makes more sense.

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  49. I'm planning on getting a 2019 full stache 8 soon and Ive had literally every single one of my bikes I've ever had stolen. luckily none of the bikes have been worth over 1000 dollars but a full stache 8 is worth many times the amount of any bike I've ever owned and it's a very good looking, beefy bike so it'll be a jackpot for a thief. I'm so worried about having it stolen…

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  50. #askGMBNtech im looking for a short travel trail smasher and happened upon the DMR Bolt frame, it can be 26" or adapted to run 27.5 (ideal) the single pivot design moves around the BB so it can be a Single speed without needing a chain tensioner – which id like to facilitate. cant find many reviews online and wondered if you have experience with this kind of frame / suspension set design. Thanks lads, Keep up the great work

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  51. Fogging machines are a great way to reduce premiums if you’re storing your bike in a garage or shed. Also stay clear of the ropes for anything valuable, used a gold rated one to lock my motorbike helmet to my motorbike and the thief was only on camera for 45 seconds including entering the carpark breaking the lock and leaving.

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  52. One suggestion – with locks you are buying time. The local thieves here will cut through absolutely anything. We use multiple chains and U-locks.

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  53. 4:26 I'm gonna mark my own house with "vicious dog" and "poor people live here"…problem solved 👌👍

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  54. Loud alarm for starters then beef the door locks and hinges to top quality the bigger the chain and lock the better use at least 3 chains and locks.however the problem now is the theives have a tool called a cordless grinder and all you can do is try to slow them down the locks are no issue anymore to them because of the grinder .bigger locks and chains will slow them down and a theif don't want to spend ages trying to get your bikes

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  55. Need to screw a scaffold plank or something similar to that back wall Doddy, forks are making a right mess of it.
    All good tips, esp strava and trailforks, turn off those gps traces near your property

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  56. Shame the police don't act on bike theft. We had a spate of bike thefts loads of videos pictures we all knew who it was. Took the police a year to get him to court. Then he got. He got away with a suspended sentence as he was 15 it was a joke. Rob a 3k bike nothing happens Rob a bank of 3k and you have a police chase and helicopters after you. Time the law was updated

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  57. Motorbike insurance approved ground anchor, chain with lock to same standard and CCTV with hard drive in house and online backup. Also if your garage is separated from the house the police might even choose not to attend, if it's part of your house they must attend(UK from experience).
    Also rebadge your bike as a Raleigh Grifter. 🙂

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  58. For a bike lock i'd use a 13mm chain with a Bowley model 543 padlock. The padlock is literally impossible to be picked and the chain is thick enough to withstand an angle grinder long enough

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  59. I would recommend getting a house alarm installed where u keep you’re bikes, I have on and it has proven to work as it has screed them off multiply times

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  60. I fail to see how any lock would even halt the progress of a criminal with a cordless grinder. Yet they'd still be a massive inconvenience at the start of every ride. Waste of time and money.

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  61. I left a brand new trek Roscoe 7 outside my house in my garden for half a hour last week and it was gone …… I now have a nukeproof scout that lives in the house

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  62. I’ve had so much stuff stolen over the years that I have changed my view on the penalties for thiefs, because what we have now isn’t working and hasent for some time. In ancient history they had a device called the stocks. This device was a large post of wood, that was stood up vertically and secured to the ground and topped with a three holed hinged block of wood that could be secured with a lock. The three holes were for securing the criminal. The center hole was for the head and the holes on ether side were for the hands. These devices were placed in the town square, as to be seen by the community. When the criminal was placed in the stocks a sign was posted describing the crime. The locals were encouraged to make the criminal uncomfortable. They would spit on, throw rotten eggs and fruit ect. I can imagine this would make a lasting impression deterring further mischief. To me we need to think outside the box as a society to restore law and order. Although I here that in the middle east thief’s can loose their fingers or hands for stealing. Jail with three hots and a cot with color cable TV has proven not to be the answer.

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  63. Rubbish advice best would be use rubbish bikes that looks like junk so won’t bring any attention at all and leave decent ones at home that what I do. Garage with thick metal bars the best you can do for secure protection

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